June Mileage Update

ImageParty / Pixabay

Halfway through the year.  Yikes!  I can’t believe we’ve already hit the longest day of the year.  I’m still struggling to remember to write 2017 on things!

June wasn’t the best month for me, workout wise.  I had more missed workouts than I would have liked, and not for reasons that I think are truly justified.

Still, June had some highlights.  Super amazing race at Escape the Cape.  Increased by FTP by 11 watts.  And some big stuff at work that isn’t all that exciting, but hey, some deadlines were met and good things happened.

June Mileage
Swim – 6.8 miles
Bike – 214 miles
Run – 57 miles

Well, you can see that I was pretty bike focused in June.  Which is a good thing.  It’s where I have the most room for improvement, and it turns out to be the training I love the most.  (Don’t get me wrong, I’m not a fast runner or swimmer either, but in terms of where I am and where I can be, the bike is where I need to focus.)

In July, I need to make a point to get in all my swimming.  If all goes as planned, next month’s stats should be higher, but anything can happen!

Year To Date
Swim – 28.7 miles
Bike – 1135 miles
Run – 281 miles

 

Wednesday Workout Recap

Last week was a busy week.  Work really kicked up again, and my training has picked up as well, so it meant for not a lot of downtime.

Monday – Rest day.  I use these for getting stuff done around the house that I inevitably didn’t get to over the weekend.

Tuesday – Scheduled for swim, but I knew that it was likely I would miss Wednesday’s workout, and I need all the bike time I could get, so I did my 75 minute structured trainer ride instead.

Wednesday – After a 9 hour meeting at work (where there was food for lunch but no actual break) I was completely burned out and went home and crashed as anticipated.  At least I planned for it.

Thursday – 5 mile run

Friday – 2000m nonstop swim.  Got distracted midway by the youth diving team.  They were so impressive.

Saturday – 9 mile run.  Well, more of a slog.  Whatever, miles covered.

Sunday – 17 mile solo ride, repeated the same 17 mile course with the group at Princeton Sports, followed by a 2 mile run, a trip to the grocery store where I magically didn’t buy all the food in the place, and then a shower and rest.

Choosing a Distance

JarkkoManty / Pixabay

This weekend, I realized just how different my training is this summer as compared to last summer.  Last year, I was focused on 70.3 training, which meant much higher mileage, especially on my bike.  A 60+ mile weekend ride was the norm, and that was easily 4-5 hours, including a stop at the gas station for snacks, a bathroom break, and refilling water.

This weekend, I did have a 9 mile run on the schedule, so not so terribly different from last summer, but my bike ride was only 2.5 hours.   I didn’t have to start at the crack of dawn and I still had a good amount of my day left.  I have to admit, I really enjoyed it.

I got out around 7:30 and rode 17 miles, then joined up with the group at Princeton Sports and rode the same 17 mile course a second time.  Somehow, I swear those hills grew between the two rides.  It really was the perfect way to do the ride.  I had to push myself through the first part to ensure that I made it back to join the group ride, and the presence of other cyclists kept me moving through the second part.  I was still slower on the second loop, but some of that is likely also due to the warmth of the day.

(And no, I didn’t quite hit 2.5 hours – I was off my 8 minutes.)

I finished the ride not feeling completely drained, did a quick 2 mile run, went to the grocery store (sorry, fellow shoppers), managed to not buy all the food in the place, and by the time I was home and showered, still had plenty of time left in the day.

That’s not to say that I won’t ever race a 70.3 again, but I’m really enjoying the balance that I get focusing on the olympic distance.  I still worked out over 8 hours this week, and that’s with missing a workout due to work commitments.  So it’s not like I’m being lazy this summer, but I feel like I have decent balance.

Given what I have planned in my life for next year (a northern European cruise in August), I’m not sure a 70.3 fits next year, due to scheduling, vacation hours, and funds, but I’m not sure that’s a bad thing.  I definitely don’t want it to be a one-and-done type of thing, but I also think I may be an olympic distance athlete.  And there’s nothing wrong with that.

I think in running and triathlon, there’s this push to do the next thing.  If you run 10ks, you get asked when you’re doing your first half marathon.  Once you do a half, people ask you when you’re going to do a full marathon.  And don’t get me started on ultras.  I did two marathons.  I don’t have any desire to do another, not because I didn’t like them, but because I just didn’t want to be spending that much time training.  I still get prodded about doing a 140.6 triathlon.  I’m completely uninterested.  I need balance in my life.

Thursday Workout Recap

Because I missed posting it yesterday.  Whoops 🙂

Monday – Rest Day.  So good at these.

Tuesday – Two mile run, followed by Team Fight swim.  These are supposed to be in the other order, but there’s nowhere for me to run after swim, plus it’s 9:00 at night and I just want to go home and sleep.

Wednesday – FTP test.  I was DREADING this.  And it went really well.  Or really terribly, depending on how you view it.  I went up by 11 watts.  That’s awesome!  Except it now means that all my FTP based workouts are going to get that much harder.  So, improvement is good, but…

Thursday – 5 mile run on the schedule, but I was burnt out.  Did about 3.5 and stopped.

Friday – 2000m nonstop swim.  I probably should have pushed for a bit more speed here.  But I got the distance in.

Saturday – 8 mile run in the soupy air.  It was only in the 70’s when I started, so I hoped that the run wouldn’t be too bad.  Nope, I forgot about the 94% humidity.

Sunday – I had been sneezing much of Saturday (allergies) and that plus the humidity meant that I just couldn’t face an outdoor bike ride.  So I pushed myself on the trainer for 2.5 hours.  Outside would have been better, but I got in the time, so I’m not going to beat myself up about it.

Cheating Surfaces Again

People seem to always find a way to cheat.  Doping is nothing new in triathlon.  It’s clearly wrong, but it’s not new, and we all know it’s continuing.  The above is a screenshot from a post on SlowTwitch.  For anyone who can’t see the image, to summarize, a woman was caught letting air out of the tire of one of her competitors just prior to IM 70.3 Syracuse.  Thankfully, she was reported, disqualified, and the victim’s tire was reinflated.

I’m sure more reporting will come out, and I would very much like to hear from this woman why she was messing with someone else’s bike (allegedly, she claimed she was trying to inflate someone else’s tire, but got the bikes confused – if so, why did air come out of a tire and not go in?).  But the sad thing is, this isn’t a unique situation.

When athletes dope, they’re only risking their own health.  When someone messes with someone else’s equipment, they’re risking injury to that other athlete.  You might think that letting air out of someone’s tire will just make them slower, or make them have to stop to change the tube (thinking there was a puncture in it).  But this could also lead to a crash and physical injury to the athlete (or to other athletes if the crash takes down others, which can very easily happen).

You hear of all sorts of suspected sabotage.  An athlete’s seatpost suddenly drops during a race because the clamp has been loosened, even though it has never fallen before.  An athlete leaves transition and finds her brake pads are misaligned and rubbing (though this can happen from the bike being accidentally bumped in transition). Tires mysteriously go flat.  Items disappear from transition.

Of course, some of this can happen randomly or by accident.  I don’t understand how you can accidentally grab someone else’s shoes in transition, but I suppose it’s possible. And when something mechanical goes wrong on your bike, sometimes that’s just dumb luck.

But sometimes, it’s because people have decided that sabotage is a great way to cheat.  Conveniently, I’m not really competition for anyone, so let’s hope my stuff is safe.  But this really mars the spirit of triathlon.  I have seen plenty of people stop to help others during races.  We’ve all seen people helping others over the finish line.  That’s the sport I love.  And sure, you can be competitive.  You can push to be faster than someone else.  But the goal is that you are faster, not that you make someone else slower.  And there’s certainly no glory in getting there by cheating.